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KNEE

Patella Resurfacing for Total Knee Replacement

During total knee replacement, your surgeon makes a cut down the front of your knee to expose your kneecap. The kneecap is essentially moved to the side so the surgeon can get to the knee joint behind it. The damaged ends of your thigh bone and shin bone are cut away. The ends are precisely measured and shaped to fit the prosthetic replacement.

Often, the underside of the kneecap (patella) is also resurfaced. Dr. Cory Calendine, Orthopaedic Surgeon discusses the process of partially replacing the under-surface of the kneecap with a prosthetic implant.

Dr. Calendine Explains Kneecap Resurfacing

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Cory Calendine, MD is an Orthopaedic Surgeon and founding partner of the Bone and Joint Institute of Tennessee at Williamson County Hospital in Franklin, TN. Dr. Calendine is an expert in Joint Replacement, specializing in Hip and Knee Surgery. From diagnosis through treatment, the Orthopaedic Surgical experts at the Bone and Joint Institute use the latest techniques and technology to improve care for people with musculoskeletal problems. For more information, please contact our office or schedule your appointment today.  

Strapped Down During Surgery?

A fear of being strapped to the bed during surgery is a concern for some patients. During most major surgeries, patients are carefully secured to operating room table to prevent movement during surgery. This is for patient safety and patients are often sedated or asleep prior to being positioned comfortably and strapped to the operating room table.

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HIP

6 Pro Golfers That Overcame Arthritis

Spring means it's time again for The Masters at Augusta National golf course and another opportunity to be motivated by Pro Golfers winning with Arthritis. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in America. Dr. Cory Calendine discusses how - with exercise programs, medications, and even joint replacement - these Professional Golfers explain how they have overcome arthritis and remain active in life.

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KNEE

Joint Surgery and Rat Poison

Surgery to replace a hip or knee joint is complex, lasts about an hour to an hour and a half, and comes with some potential complications. A rare complication following knee or hip replacement is the development of a blood clot or deep vein thrombosis. A medication called Warfarin (previously used as a rat poison) is used along with other treatments to prevent blood clots after joint replacement surgery.

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